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Welcome to Why I Really Like This Book, a podcast series about books that ought not to be forgotten. The podcasts were written, recorded and edited by me, Kate Macdonald, from 2011 to 2014 in a house in Brussels. I'm an English lecturer and an lifelong rummager in second-hand bookshops, and I write a lot about books, so podcasts was an enjoyable way to talk about what I was reading.

The intro music is by The Tribe Band, and the illustration is by Harriet Marsh.

In 2014 I stopped recording podcasts and moved to katemacdonald.net. That's my personal site where I post information about my books and articles, the research I do, and where I post book reviews twice a week. Many of the reviews are the scripts for the podcasts, so I keep this excellent Libsyn site going so anyone passing by can listen to three or more years of podcasts. One day I may start recording again.

Aug 26, 2011

The anthropology of the English: what they do when they aren't thinking. A podcast about Kate Fox's brilliant book on the instantly recognisable characteristics of that small island race. If you know even just one English person, or a Brit, this podcast on Watching the English is for you. Class, cars, the English sense...


Aug 22, 2011

This podcast on Like Water for Chocolate (1989) is all about food, and magic, and the alarming capacity for love to do dangerous things. Mexican cooking, and the terrible fate of the youngest daughter who may not marry, but must stay at home to care for her mother forever, cause very dramatic consequences in the...


Aug 22, 2011

This podcast takes us into the wards in wartime, stomping about with a bucket for hours and hours, barely conscious that the bombs are falling because it's another night shift in the maternity ward. Monica Dickens was the great-grand-daughter of the much more famous Charles, and worked as a nurse during the Second World...


Aug 22, 2011

This podcast goes French, and describes for your consideration a beautiful little novella by the scandalously unafraid French woman of letters, Colette. Julie de Carneilhan is about the survival of an aristocratic divorcee in Paris, in poverty. It is strangely uplifting towards the end, where Julie rides off away from...


Aug 22, 2011

This podcast talks about two novels by Scottish novelist John Buchan, once terrifically famous for The Thirty-Nine Steps (1915), then moribund for decades, and now an up-and-coming out-of-copyright favourite for a new generation of readers. John Macnab (1925) is a Highland romp, where three bored men of high position...