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Welcome to Why I Really Like This Book, a podcast series about books that ought not to be forgotten. The podcasts were written, recorded and edited by me, Kate Macdonald, from 2011 to 2014 in a house in Brussels. I'm an English lecturer and an lifelong rummager in second-hand bookshops, and I write a lot about books, so podcasts was an enjoyable way to talk about what I was reading.

The intro music is by The Tribe Band, and the illustration is by Harriet Marsh.

In 2014 I stopped recording podcasts and moved to katemacdonald.net. That's my personal site where I post information about my books and articles, the research I do, and where I post book reviews twice a week. Many of the reviews are the scripts for the podcasts, so I keep this excellent Libsyn site going so anyone passing by can listen to three or more years of podcasts. One day I may start recording again.

Mar 29, 2012

Clubland London between the wars, a secret codicil to a will, and a viciously unhappy marriage. The murderer, thief and lying she-devil Rowena is determined to make her husband divorce her so she can marry and dispose of a nobleman, keeping his title and money en route. Dornford Yates' This Publican is an attack on how...


Mar 23, 2012

The Jewish family saga of G B Stern's The Matriarch is dominated by the party-planning interfering head of the family, Anastasia the adored eldest sister, the engulfing wife, the admired mother, the bossy aunt and the totally dominating Grandmere. She's a monster of cheerful bullying, a delightful character you wouldn't...


Mar 16, 2012

This is a splendidly entertaining novella by Jane Austen, written as 41 letters between the characters of a tightly-plotted farce, doninated by the towering figure of Lady Susan. She is a magnificently disloyal houseguest (she sleeps with the husband and seduces the daughter's suitor), a bullying mother (she torments...


Mar 9, 2012

In the middle of the Second World War, Lady Carados found a dead woman in her son's bed, so she decided to move it somewhere else, which is why Albert Campion got involved because the body ended up in his bed instead. In Margery Allingham's Coroner's Pidgin, Campion is struggling with sleep deprivation, the blackout,...


Mar 2, 2012

We're plunged into 1930s high society, riddled with blackmail, drugs and wicked little gambling dens. Girls have gone back to being chaperoned, and wives are deceiving their husbands. It's all rather sordid, and then Lord Robert gets suffocated in a taxi on the way back from the heady, glittering, gossiping Carrados...