Why I Really Like This Book
These are podcasts about forgotten fiction, for curious readers, and for anyone who likes old books. Sometimes they're stories, sometimes they're not. Most of the authors write in English; and sometimes they don't. But all the books I talk about, I really really like. I hope you will too.
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My name is Kate Macdonald: I'm an English lecturer, and a lifelong browser in second-hand bookshops. I post weekly ten-minute podcasts on a Friday, on the books I really like which I think deserve new readers. You can find out lots more at the Facebook page here, and get these podcasts weekly by subscribing on the iTunes link above.

The music for the podcast intro is by The Tribe Band. Lucy Marsh did the drawing and Matthias Opsomer lettered it. Patrick Belk and Martin Fowler hold my tech safety net.

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Questions? Send me a message by mailing me at kate [dot] brussels [at] yahoo [dot] com.

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Read all about the power of the Edwardian newspaper in this short story about bullying, corruption, the abuse of power, and the defeat of small-mindedness. Rudyard Kipling's 'The Village That Voted The Earth Was Flat' is a lesson in collusion and taking revenge.

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More wigs! More swordfights! Learn how to tip wine down your coat sleeve if you don't want to get drunk while dressed in clothes of the opposite sex. Study the disguises of highwaymen and practice your court curtseys. Georgette Heyer's The Masqueraders teaches valuable life skills for the 18th century.

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Get out the jewel box and summon the wig powderer, the aristocrats have escaped the Terror, and are looking for revenge. Some magnificent swashbuckling action and double-crossing plot twists in Baroness Orczy's classic novel of the French Revolution, in which the Scarlet Pimpernel leads the establishment's backlash against Revolutionary excess.

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Yet more galloping about in the heather, in the late 17th century as an anxious nation awaits the departure of James III and the arrival of William of Orange. John Buchan's John Burnet of Barns has his estate to worry about, and his girl, and knows that his wicked cousin Gilbert will have them all if he can. For law-abiding folk who believe in virtue being its own reward.

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